The Albanian government has, for the first time, issued a joint condemnation of Chinese state-backed cybercrime, urging Beijing to support a hacking group that “continues to exploit vulnerabilities and find success” in Australia. .

There is fresh tension between Beijing and Taipei. Taiwan is demanding an explanation after detaining a Taiwanese fishing boat off the coast of China. Taiwanese authorities could not prevent the boat and its crew from being towed to a Chinese port. It is only the third time in eight years that a Taiwanese ship has sailed twice in the past six months.

On Tuesday, the country’s top cyber security agency, the Australian Signals Directorate, issued an advisory note supported by the US, UK, Canada, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, and Germany, which detailed the group’s malicious cyber attacks. Activities were condemned.

It is the first time Australia has sought to call out Chinese state-backed hacking and digital espionage and comes amid a tense period in relations between the two countries as the government seeks to restore stability in relations.

According to the ASD, APT40 is “actively conducting regular reconnaissance against networks of interest in Australia, looking for opportunities to compromise its targets,” the agency cited in two case studies outlining the threat. is extended.

On Tuesday, the country’s top cyber security agency, the Australian Signals Directorate, issued an advisory note supported by the US, UK, Canada, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea, and Germany, which detailed the group’s malicious cyber attacks. Activities were condemned. Image: Provided

In one, Australia’s Cybersecurity Agency says hackers stole several hundred unique usernames and passwords from an unnamed organization in April 2022, while in another, access to “large amounts of sensitive data” appeared to that there was a “deliberately targeted” attack.

ASD explained that APT 40 relies on devices that are nearing the end of their use or are no longer maintained to access networks of interest and “such systems that are poorly maintained and unpatched”.

ASD added that it prefers exploiting vulnerable, public-facing infrastructure to exploiting human error through techniques such as phishing, with hackers conducting follow-up operations and stealing valid login details. “high priority” to achieve. Data

Similar actions have been taken by Kryptonite Panda, Gingham Typhoon, Leviathan, and Bronze Mohawk, all groups believed to report to China’s Ministry of State Security.

The Albanian government has called on China to “regularly spy” on hacking group APT40 and support state-sponsored cyber attacks on Australia. Photo: Getty Images

Responding to Tuesday’s announcement, Defense Minister Richard Marles praised the work of Australia’s top cyber security agency for ensuring “Australians stay safe”.

“The Albanian government is committed to defending Australian organizations and individuals in the cyber domain, which is why we are leading the first cyber attribute of this kind,” he said.

“This award is the result of the Australian Signals Directorate’s diligent work to uncover this malicious cyber activity and is an important part of ensuring Australians are protected from cyber attacks.”

China has not yet responded to the announcement, but Beijing has long maintained that it is not involved in hacking groups targeting foreign countries.

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A U.S.-led attribution of responsibility that blamed China’s foreign ministry for a series of attacks on U.S. infrastructure last year by Typhoon Volt drew a sharp rebuke.

Australia supported the announcement at the time, and its latest statement drew notable support from Japan and South Korea, which signed an accord for the first time to rein in Beijing’s cyber activities. The pressure is on.

Speaking to Sky News Australia last month, former Home Affairs Secretary Michael Pizzolo claimed that China’s activities “near an act of war,While ASD warned Australia in November last year. An unusual number of attacks are encountered. every year.

The agency has repeatedly identified “state-sponsored” threats as one of the biggest drivers of growing cybercrime, with China, North Korea and Russia targeting Australians, governments and businesses. Suspected of employing hackers to create



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